George Brysson’s Jeopardy – Rosewell, Midlothian –  SFH062

George Brysson’s Jeopardy – Rosewell, Midlothian – SFH062

Living and hiding in the vicinity of Roslin Glen, George Brysson tells his own story of being hunted by government soldiers. “From one concealment to another he had to flee, making his way gradually back to the familiar homestead. Sometimes he slept in the wood beside the house, sometimes under the ripening corn; sometimes he would venture for a night into his own bed…George Brysson ran perilous risks so long as he lingered near the Midlothian home” says Alexander Smellie. In this episode we get a brief glimpse of some of his experiences. (The main photograph is of the woods in Roslin Glen close to his home).

 

 

 

 

Trembling for the Gospel More than Prison – Edmund Calamy – SFH061

Trembling for the Gospel More than Prison – Edmund Calamy – SFH061

What message should you give when you will be imprisoned for preaching? A giant of the Westminster Assembly—helping to prepare the Catechism—Edmund Calamy lived  to see days of peril for the gospel. Preaching illegally would put him in prison, but he had an urgent message for the Church. Find out how this aged minister pours out his sorrowful concern with wise counsel. You can read the full sermon in Sermons of the Great Ejection, published by the Banner of Truth Trust.

 

Wise Words in a Time of Trouble – Archibald Skeldie, Edinburgh – SFH060

Wise Words in a Time of Trouble – Archibald Skeldie, Edinburgh – SFH060

As war and pestilence marched unstoppably towards Edinburgh in 1645, there was every reason to fear. It needed the courage of the blind preacher, Archibald Skeldie to speak wise and timely words in this critical moment. What could he say that would strengthen and counsel the people in their time of need? We find out more about the man, the context and his message in this episode.

The Tragedy of James Tinto – Temple, Midlothian – SFH059

The Tragedy of James Tinto – Temple, Midlothian – SFH059

The pretty village of Temple and its surrounding farms provided another centre of Covenanter activity in Midlothian. We know rather little about the Covenanters of this parish, their experiences and backgrounds. In a few cases we only have a name but we are in fact able to trace something of the tragic story of one Temple man named James Tinto. (Please don’t travel to the village during the Covid-19 crisis)

 

“One of the best and ablest men in Britain” – Interview about James Durham – SFH058

“One of the best and ablest men in Britain” – Interview about James Durham – SFH058

C H Spurgeon said, “If I had lived in Durham’s time, I should never, I think, have wanted to hear any other preacher; I would have sat, both by night and day, to receive the sweet droppings of his honeyed lips.” Who was James Durham and why did he deserve such high regard? There are few people better placed to take us in to the life and significance of this man than Donald John Maclean. In this interview we discover a fascinating ministry that continues today. It was Robert Baillie who described Durham as “one of the best and ablest men in Britain”. Baillie’s desire still remains as relevant as ever, “O if it were the good pleasure of the Master of the vineyard to plant many such noble vines in this land!”

Donald John has also given an address on James Durham, 1622-1658: A Life Lived In Service Of The Church.

 

Forgotten Riches from Rutherford’s ‘Christ Dying’ – Interview with Rob McCurley – SFH057

Forgotten Riches from Rutherford’s ‘Christ Dying’ – Interview with Rob McCurley – SFH057

Even many who love to read Samuel Rutherford’s spiritually rich devotional letters have never heard of or read some of his other books. One forgotten book that exalts the glory of the Redeemer in a way that readers of the letters will recognise is called Christ Dying and Drawing Sinners to Himself. In a series of sermons on John chapter 12, Rutherford enters into deep meditation on Christ’s person and sufferings. Rev. Rob McCurley has made a special study of the book and in this extended interview he is able to help summarise it and explain its value for today. He explains why it is his favourite of all the books Rutherford wrote. Join us in mining these spiritual riches to get insights for today.