Trinity Apse, Chalmer’s Close, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt5 – SH015

Trinity Apse, Chalmer’s Close, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt5 – SH015

Matthew Vogan finds the original church building where the people of Edinburgh began to sign the National Covenant. But what does the Old Scots word “Yellach”  (or yelloch) mean?  And why did the people give it?  

To dig deeper, visit www.scotlandforgottenhistory.com

 

Photo Credit –  © Copyright kim traynor – CC by SA 2.0

Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt4 – SFH014

Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt4 – SFH014

What happened when the ministers in the Church of Scotland were of one mind and agreed on a united course of action to stand for true religion, in accordance with their Confession, in order to recover the purity and liberty of the gospel?  Matthew Vogan explains more in part 4 of the Journey of the Covenant.

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

Candlemaker Row, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt3 – SFH013

Candlemaker Row, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt3 – SFH013

It’s the morning of the 28th of February, and the National Covenant is making its way up the hill to Greyfriars Kirk….

Matthew Vogan continues tracing the Journey of the Covenant from a very noisy Candlemaker Row in Edinburgh, just round the corner from the Grassmarket.

To dig deeper, visit www.scotlandsforgottenhistory.com

The Three Sisters, Cowgate, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt2 – SFH012

The Three Sisters, Cowgate, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt2 – SFH012

On Tuesday, 27th February, 1638, a group of between two to three hundred ministers met here (the Tailors’ Hall) to consider the draft text of the National Covenant for signing at Greyfriars the next day.  Matthew Vogan traces the Journey of the National Covenant through the most significant surviving buildings in the Old Town of Edinburgh.

To dig deeper, visit www.scotlandsforgottenhistory.com

Picture credit – Tailors’ Hall, Cowgate.  © Copyright Kim Traynor (CC2.0)

Warriston’s Close, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt1 – SFH011

Warriston’s Close, Edinburgh – The Journey of the Covenant, Pt1 – SFH011

The National Covenant was renewed on the 28 February 1638.  Archibald Johnston, one of the drafters alongside Alexander Henderson, described that day as “The Glorious Marriage Day of the Kingdom With God.”  Over steep steps and cobbled streets, Matthew Vogan traces the Journey of the Covenant around the nooks and crannies of Edinburgh’s old town. Ultimately, the National Covenant would spread across the whole nation, but how did it begin?

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com