The Blind Minister and the Plague – Edinburgh – SFH053

The Blind Minister and the Plague – Edinburgh – SFH053

The plague epidemic reached Edinburgh in 1645.  At the end of 1644, before it reached the town, the blind minister Archibald Skeldie preached a sermon that still has many insights for facing pandemic diseases today. One of these lessons relates to the danger of excessive fear.

“A Christian, after death, will not much care what way he hath died; whether by fever or pestilence, by natural or violent death, seeing he is delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the sons of God.” (Archibald Skeldie)

 

Chamberlain Road, Edinburgh – The Apothecary & The Plague – John Livingstone’s Tombstone – SFH050

Chamberlain Road, Edinburgh – The Apothecary & The Plague – John Livingstone’s Tombstone – SFH050

“Mors Patet, Hora Latet.”  So reads the Latin inscription on a small mausoleum wall at 1 Chamberlain Road, Edinburgh. “Death is sure, the hour is obscure.”

It’s the mausoleum of an apothecary called John Livingstone (The crest on the gravestone is the Livingstone crest) who died in 1645, likely as a result of the plague that swept through the city killed up to half the population.  The other inscription on the gravestone still speaks to us today about how to live amidst a time of pandemic disease and fears.

“This saint, whose corpse lies buried here,

Let all posterity admire

For upright life in godly fear.

 

When judgments did this land surround

He, with God, was walking found

For which, from midst of fears, he’s crowned.

 

Here to be interred both he

And friends by providence agree

No age shall lose his memory.

His age 53

Died 1645

For more information about this location, visit Historic Environment Scotland’s website.

TO dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

The Covenanters’ Prison, Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh – SFH046

The Covenanters’ Prison, Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh – SFH046

Matthew Vogan explains a little of the history of two of the buildings in Greyfriars Kirkyard; the Covenanters’ Prison and the mausoleum for George Mackenzie.  “Bluidy Mackenzie,” as the Lord Advocate during the rule of Charles II, was responsible for much of the persecution and execution of the Covenanters.

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

John Law on the Bass Rock – Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh – SFH045

John Law on the Bass Rock – Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh – SFH045

In Greyfriars Kiryard in Edinburgh, there’s a memorial to a little known minister called John Law and his wife, Isabella Cuninghame. The inscription reads:

“To the memory of his most excellent parents Mr JOHN LAW, a most prudent and vigilant pastor of the Church at Edinburgh, distinguished by his zeal for pure religion, and his unfeigned piety; and ISABELLA CUNNINGHAME, his affectionate wife, noted for true holiness, and the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, who, pressing towards the joys of eternal life, laid aside mortality, the former on the 26th December A.D. 1712, his 80th year; the latter on the 8th November A.D. 1703, in her 70th year. This monument was dedicated by William Law, their son.”

Matthew Vogan explains more.

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh

Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh

One of the oldest buildings in Edinburgh, the Magdalen Chapel was built in 1541 and has the oldest surviving stained glass in Scotland. It was the location for the first ever General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and the building played a significant, if somewhat sombre role during the Covenanter era.  Matthew Vogan explains more.  (8m 38s)

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com