Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh

Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh

One of the oldest buildings in Edinburgh, the Magdalen Chapel was built in 1541 and has the oldest surviving stained glass in Scotland. It was the location for the first ever General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and the building played a significant, if somewhat sombre role during the Covenanter era.  Matthew Vogan explains more.  (8m 38s)

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

 

 

James Guthrie and the Old Mercat Cross, Edinburgh – SFH042

James Guthrie and the Old Mercat Cross, Edinburgh – SFH042

Many Covenanters were executed by the State at the Tolbooth in Edinburgh.  Matthew Vogan is on the Royal Mile to tell us about James Guthrie, the second person to be executed at the Tolbooth in Edinburgh on the 1st June 1661, only 5 days after Archibald Campbell, the Marquis of Argyll.

To dig deeper, visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

Parliament Square, Edinburgh – SFH041

Parliament Square, Edinburgh – SFH041

What connects the statue of King Charles II, Parliament Hall and John Knox’s Grave marker at car park space 23 in Parliament Square, Edinburgh?  Matthew Vogan pieces the picture together for a group of Dutch students visiting Scotland in this week’s episode.

To dig deeper visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com

 

Captain Paton’s Sword – Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh – SFH039

Captain Paton’s Sword – Magdalen Chapel, Edinburgh – SFH039

The sword featured in “Scotland’s Forgotten Suffering” (episode three of Scotland’s Forgotten History) was owned by Captain John Paton from Fenwick in Ayrshire.  He fought with the Covenanters at the Pentland Rising, Battle of Drumclog and Battle of Bothwell Bridge.  He was executed in the Grassmarket on 9 May 1684.  Matthew Vogan is in the Magdalen Chapel where Paton’s body would have been prepared prior to burial in the nearby Greyfriars Kirkyard.

 

To dig deeper visit ScotlandsForgottenHistory.com